Tag Archives: Mick Abrahams

Glenn Cornick – Jethro Tull Original Bassist, Joins The Great Beyond

English: Glenn Cornick, bass player of Jethro ...
English: Glenn Cornick, bass player of Jethro Tull. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
I awoke this morning to have the Mrs. tell me that Glenn Cornick, the original bass guitarist for Jethro Tull passed away yesterday. Glenn Cornick is the first member of the original Jethro Tull to join the Great Beyond. Sigh. Death comes to us all.

I reflect on what Glenn Cornick and the early Jethro Tull band means to me. The beautiful aspect of musicians we admire is that we can continue to stay connected with them through their recorded music.

From Glenn Cornick’s Bio on the Official Jethro Tull Website:

“This Was”, “Stand Up” and “Benefit” were to feature the personable and idiosyncratic style of Glenn Cornick during the next three years in which he played his important role in the early years of Tull.

Ever the party animal, Glenn grew apart from the other band members during 1970. This was a reflection, not of Glenn’s social waywardness, but of the reclusive and insular nature of the other guys’ rather private and atypical lifestyles.

Glenn was “invited to leave” by manager Terry Ellis but given due encouragement to form his own Chrysalis Records signed band “Wild Turkey” which enjoyed some success with records

Cover of "This Was"
Cover of This Wasand tours supporting Jethro Tull.

 

I am listening to Jethro Tull’s This Was recollecting fond memories of watching Glenn Cornick play bass live with Jethro Tull in 1969 at The Fillmore East on the Stand Up tour. I saw him once more at The Capitol Theatre in Portchester, NY April, 1970 on the Benefit tour.

Glenn Cornick was a very animated bass player. He had long black hair that he attempted to keep in control with a head band. But when he played bass he would dance wildly as his hair flopped all around his face. Loved that image of him and that’s how I want to remember Glenn Cornick best. Happily immersed in his pursuit of bass notes driving Tull along.

Peace be with you Glenn Cornick the music of our heart goes out to your family and loved ones in this time of sorrow.

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Elliott Randall – Virtual Memory

I am excited to share that Elliot Randall‘s new CD, Virtual Memory is available for purchase.

If you are not familiar with Elliott Randall you should be.

I first saw Elliott Randall with Randall’s Island  in 1971 when they were the opening act for John Mayall‘s band (USA Union vintage). I dug Randall’s Island and loved when Elliott Randall came back out to play “Reelin In The Years” with Mayall ;)

Elliott Randall is a consummate guitar perfectionist evidenced well by his latest recording which marks his 50th year of his “life in the music business”.

The tracks are uniquely diverse yet weave a cohesive blend for the attentive listener. The wide spectrum of genres recorded will appeal to the subtlest of music tastes.

You’ll marvel at the guest stars who play with Elliott, beginning with Mick Abrahams whose work I have always admired from Jethro Tull and Blodwyn Pig (Dear Jill). This YouTube video of Elliott and Mick will give you some flavor ;)

THE MUSICIANS

Guitars: Elliott Randall, Mick Abrahams, Steve Donnelly, Tommy Emmerton; Piano/Keyboards: Paul Griffin, Wayne Brown, Paul ShafferPete Murray, Eric Johnson; Drums: Allen Herman, Jamie Oldaker, Andy Treacey; Bass: Mo Foster, Andy Pask, Chris Bishop, “Level” Neville Malcolm; Woodwinds: Paul Fleisher, Sam Rivers, Frank Walden, Marty Kersich, Trumpet & Flugelhorn: Martin Shaw, Al Chez; Trombone: Kevin Osborne; Vibraphone: Hugh Wilkinson

SoundCloud Definitive Sample

My Sunday Feeling – Jethro Tull

This Was
Image via Wikipedia

This is a classic song for an Indian Summer Sunday afternoon.  “My Sunday Feeling” is taken from the debut Jethro Tull album, This Was (1968)  featuring Ian Anderson on vocals and flute, Mick Abrahams on guitar, Glenn Cornick on bass and Clive Bunker on drums