Greenwich Village: Music That Defined a Generation

We continue with the theme of Greenwich Village, Folk Music, the 60’s, Suze Rotolo, Bob Dylan, and Dave Van Ronk.

Tomorrow, November 12th is the release date for the documentary, Greenwich Village: Music That Defined a GenerationDirected by Laura Archibald.

In April of 1961, more than 500 musicians gathered in Greenwich Village’s Washington Square to sing folk songs to promote peace and harmony. The result was what would become a symbol of these tumultuous times, police riot squads attacking singers and civilians with billy clubs, arrests and lines drawn in the sand.

The clash became known as the Washington Square Folk Riot and put down in the history books as the first ‘freedom of speech’ revolt, and only strengthened the drawing power of Greenwich Village as the place of change for a generation.

The movie’s structural binding ingredient is the voice of Susan Sarandon reading excerpts from “A Freewheelin’ Time: A Memoir of Greenwich Village,” a 2008 recollection by Mr. Dylan’s onetime girlfriend Suze Rotolo, who met him in 1961, when she was 17 and he was 20. (Movie Review, When They Hammered Out Justice in the ’60s ‘Greenwich Village: Music That Defined a Generation’ by Stephen Holden, NY Times, January 17, 2013)

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