Patti Smith at the Minetta Lane

I love when Patti Smith narrates her audio books. There is something about her voice that soothes the passion in my soul. Her latest title is Patti Smith at the Minetta Lane. It is available from Audible. You can download it and listen for free if this is the first time you are getting an Audible trial account.

I just finished reading Will Hermes article about Patti’s performance in the New York Times this morning. He is a superb music journalist and I am glad to see him writing for the Times. 

Her stage patter has always been its own entertainment, part stand-up comedy, part populist sermonizing.

Patti Smith at the Minetta Lane features live audio of performances captured over three evenings in September of 2018 at the Minetta Lane Theatre in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village, woven into a single, one-of-a-kind audio event. Pioneering artist and writer Patti Smith commands the stage to perform original spoken-word stories from her life, interwoven with the music of her beloved catalogue, played live by Smith, her son and daughter–Jackson and Jesse Paris Smith–and longtime collaborator Tony Shanahan. What transpires is a personally revelatory showcase, an intimate portrait of an icon, focusing on family and taking stock of a near to 50-year career devoted to artistic integrity.

©2018 Patti Smith (P)2018 Audible Originals, LLC.

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Bitten By The Blues

Bitten By The Blues: The Alligator Records Story – Bruce Iglauer & Patrick A. Roberts

University of Chicago Press

bruce iglauer book image

Alligator Records may well be the premier blues record label on the planet. A quick review of the label’s releases over the past forty-seven plus years turns up one legendary artist after another, and some of the leading lights of the current blues scene. At the center of the label stands Bruce Iglauer, founder and owner, who now gives blues fans a deep, compelling look into how he built the label from a very humble start.

In the book’s forward, Iglauer is clear about his motivation for the Alligator label. “Most of Alligator’s records move your feet or your body, but we also try to make records that move that other part: your soul. It’s music that can cleanse your inner pain by pulling that pain right out of you….the mission of Alligator, was to carry Chicago’s South and West Side blues to a worldwide audience of young adults like me. Now it has become a mission to find and record musicians who will bring the essence of blues – its catharsis, its sense of tradition, its raw emotional power, and its healing feeling – to a new audience”.

As a college study in Wisconsin, Iglauer visited Chicago, primarily to visit the Jazz Record Mart and to find a blues band to book for his school’s homecoming dance. Once there, he fell under the spell of Bob Koester, legendary owner of the store and the Delmark Record label. Koester assigned one of his employees to take Iglauer around to some of the clubs on the south and west sides of Chicago. At a small joint owned by the late Eddie Shaw, Iglauer saw guitarists Otis Rush, Jimmy Dawkins, and Hound Dog Taylor, who made an indelible impression.

Finishing school, Iglauer made a permanent move to Chicago, where he started working full-time hours as the Delmark shipping clerk for part-time pay. He spent his nights in the blues clubs throughout the city. Iglauer would frequently catch Taylor and his band, watching them fill the dance floor night after night. It was a raw sound form a self-taught musician, as the author notes,”He couldn’t read music and probably could not have told you the name of the notes the strings of his guitar were tuned to, and, as he tuned by ear, they might be different on different nights”. Once he established that Koester had no interest in recording Taylor, Iglauer put his plan together to record the band with Brewer Phillips on guitar and Ted Harvey on drums. Those sessions became Hound Dog Taylor And The House Rockers, the 1971 release that announced the start of a new blues record label.

Along with co-author Patrick A. Roberts, Iglauer weaves a fascinating narrative that delves into three separate aspects of the Alligator story. An obvious focus is the owner’s recollections of all of the artists that found a home on the label, many becoming close personal friends. From legends like Albert Collins, Koko Taylor, James Cotton, Luther Allison, and William Clarke, to guitar heroes like Johnny Winter, Roy Buchanan, and Lonnie Mack, as well as bringing Louisiana artists like Professor Longhair, Dr. John, Katie Webster, and zydeco king Clifton Chenier to a wider audience, Iglauer’s stories provide meaningful depth to our understanding and appreciation for these artists. There are also moments of sadness, with the passing of friends or tragic accidents, like the 1978 train derailment in Norway that nearly killed Iglauer and the entire Son Seals Band, in the mist of a European tour.

A second aspect of the book chronicles Iglauer’s growth as a human being, and as a label owner. He offers fair assessments of his shortcomings as well as some of his best ideas. The label hit the jackpot with the double disc Twentieth Anniversary Collection, which sold ten times the number of a regular solo artist release, and the Grammy winning Showdown, which combined the talents of Collins, Robert Cray, and Johnny Copeland. Early on, he learns several valuable lessons regarding the role of producer on recording projects, including the need to say no when required. At one point, Iglauer became a reggae fan, and released a number of fine recordings in that genre that failed to connect in the marketplace. Realizing his dream to work with another legend, Johnny Otis, Iglauer quickly learns what happens when you craft an album with too much blues for the R&B crowd, and not enough blues for that audience. He even readily admits to turning down a one-shot offer to record Stevie Ray Vaughan early in his career.

Perhaps a crucial part of the narrative concerns the description of the actual business of running a label. Over time, Alligator grew to be more than just a record company, offering artist management, bookkeeping, and tour booking services for the musicians on the label. Iglauer sheds a light on some areas of the business that the average fan may not understand. He enlightens readers on the practice of licensing recordings from other labels for release in a new market. His explanation of the record distribution system is telling, both in the way it progressed from the owner delivering boxes of albums from the trunk of his car, to major distribution companies that allow music to reach a wider market, but can be disastrous for a label like Alligator if the distributor fails, leaving tens of thousands of dollars in unpaid invoices. There is also reflections on the challenges of selling albums versus compact discs, and the on-going struggle to figure out on to make money for the artists and the label as streaming services continue to have a severe negative impact on music sales.

It is a story well-told, one that will resonate with every blues fan. In fact, anyone who loves American roots music should pour through this book. Readers will undoubtedly gain new insights into some of their favorite musicians and classic recordings, in addition to getting a firm grasp on the magnitude of achievements that Iglauer has accomplished through the Alligator label. This one is most highly recommended!

Reviewer Mark Thompson lives in Florida, where he is enjoying the sun and retirement. He is the President of the Board of Directors for the Suncoast Blues Society and a member of the Board of Directors for the Blues Foundation. Music has been a huge part of his life for the past fifty years – just ask his wife 😉

This review is courtesy of Blues Blast Magazine and is featured in the November 2018 issue.

The Boy and The Piano

This Christmas advertisement from John Lewis & Partners featuring Sir Elton John is certain to touch your heart.

Is there anything more precious than a boy, his piano, and a gift from his Mum?

IT WAS IMPORTANT FOR ME THAT THE ADVERT WAS CLOSE TO MY ACTUAL MEMORIES AND EXPERIENCE SO IT HAD THAT EMOTIONAL IMPACT. AND YES, THE PIANO HAS ALWAYS BEEN A BIG PART OF MY LIFE. MY EARLIEST MEMORIES ALWAYS REVOLVE AROUND MUSIC AND THE PIANO WAS ALWAYS AT THE CENTRE OF FAMILY LIFE WHEN I WAS GROWING UP.”- Sir Elton John CBE

Into The Light – The Music Photography of Jerome Brunet

I have a fantastic music photographer to share, Jerome Brunet.

He has a new coffee table book available now,  Into the Light – The Music Photography of Jerome Brunet 

The book is a twenty year portfolio that captures live performances of prominent musicians. His lens offers a unique view of the artist from the vantage point of the stage and orchestra pit.

This publication is a welcome addition to any music photography collection.

A portion of the proceeds will go to the Pinetop Perkins Foundation.

I can’t wait to get my signed copy in two to three weeks.

30 Days of the Dead, 2018

What is 30 Days of the Dead ? Each day during the month of November the Dead are giving away a high-quality 320Kbps MP3 download. That’s 30 days of unreleased Grateful Dead tracks from the vault, selected by Dead archivist David Lemieux! Today is Day 5, “Doin’ that Rag”.
Guess the venue and date correctly and you’ll be automatically entered to win the prize of the day, a 2019 Grateful Dead Wall Calendar. Each day a winner will be selected at random, so take your time and make your best guess! Additionally if you answer correctly, you will be automatically entered in a drawing for the PACIFIC NORTHWEST ’73-’74 THE COMPLETE RECORDINGS boxed set.