Buffy Sainte-Marie: The Authorized Biography By Andrea Warner

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The Buffy Sainte-Marie authorized biography will be released on September 25, 2018. It’s a powerful, intimate look at the life of a beloved folk icon and activist.

The Saskatchewan-born Cree singer-songwriter “has made her voice heard through her music, art, and activism, establishing herself among the ranks of folk greats such as Joni Mitchell and Bob Dylan,” according to publisher Greystone Books.

“But Sainte-Marie is so much more than a musician; she is also an entrepreneur, a pioneer in digital art, and an important cultural activist who has worked tirelessly advocating for and protecting Indigenous rights and freedoms.”

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“Warner’s book draws decades of incredible, world-changing accomplishments together to make an irrefutable case for Sainte-Marie’s place among the rock n’ roll and songwriting greats.” Tanya Tagaq – Experimental vocalist, and artist

Buffy Sainte Marie

Andrea Warner is a writer, critic, broadcaster, and Podcaster focusing on music, arts, pop culture, and feminism. She’s also the author of the acclaimed 2015 book, We Oughta Know: How Four Women Ruled the ’90s and Changed Canadian Music (Eternal Cavalier Press). Andrea is an associate producer at CBC Music and co-hosts the weekly podcast, Pop This!.

Andrea has also written An Essential Guide to Buffy Sainte-Marie for those who want to discover the gems in Buffy’s 20 album catalog prior to obtaining her book.

Pre-orders for the book may be placed:

1) In Canada at your local bookstoreAmazon, or Indigo.
2) In the USA, at your local bookstore/IndieboundAmazon, or Barnes & Noble

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A Free Press Needs You

In 1787, the year the Constitution was adopted, Thomas Jefferson famously wrote to a friend, “Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

That’s how he felt before he became president, anyway. Twenty years later, after enduring the oversight of the press from inside the White House, he was less sure of its value. “Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper,” he wrote. “Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle.”

Jefferson’s discomfort was, and remains, understandable. Reporting the news in an open society is an enterprise laced with conflict. His discomfort also illustrates the need for the right he helped enshrine. As the founders believed from their own experience, a well-informed public is best equipped to root out corruption and, over the long haul, promote liberty and justice.

“Public discussion is a political duty,” the Supreme Court said in 1964. That discussion must be “uninhibited, robust, and wide-open,” and “may well include vehement, caustic and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.”

In 2018, some of the most damaging attacks are coming from government officials. Criticizing the news media — for underplaying or overplaying stories, for getting something wrong — is entirely right. News reporters and editors are human, and make mistakes. Correcting them is core to our job. But insisting that truths you don’t like are “fake news” is dangerous to the lifeblood of democracy. And calling journalists the “enemy of the people” is dangerous, period.

These attacks on the press are particularly threatening to journalists in nations with a less secure rule of law and to smaller publications in the United States, already buffeted by the industry’s economic crisis. And yet the journalists at those papers continue to do the hard work of asking questions and telling the stories that you otherwise wouldn’t hear. Consider The San Luis Obispo Tribune, which wrote about the death of a jail inmate who was restrained for 46 hours. The account forced the county to change how it treats mentally ill prisoners.

Answering a call last week from The Boston Globe, The Times is joining hundreds of newspapers, from large metro-area dailies to small local weeklies, to remind readers of the value of America’s free press. These editorials, some of which we’ve excerpted, together affirm a fundamental American institution.

If you haven’t already, please subscribe to your local papers. Praise them when you think they’ve done a good job and criticize them when you think they could do better. We’re all in this together.

Jackson Browne First Artist Ever to Receive Gandhi Peace Award

Congratulations to Jackson Browne in becoming the first artist to receive the Gandhi Peace Award. Promoting Enduring Peace announced that the award will be accepted by singer-songwriter Jackson Browne on Friday, September 14, 2018, at a ceremony beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the United Church on the Green at 270 Temple Street in New Haven, Connecticut.

I am invited to attend this event and look forward to witnessing Jackson Browne receive this honor in person. Jackson Browne’s activism and commitment to peace have been his lifelong mission.

I  joined Promoting Enduring Peace because I truly believe in Gandhi and non-violence. Ralph Nader is both a past recipient of the Gandhi Peace Award and an active member of this essential group.

If you are interested in “Peace on Earth, Peace with Earth” I recommend that you subscribe to Peace News.

Here is the press release.

New Haven, CT —  Promoting Enduring Peace announces that the 2018 Gandhi Peace Award will be accepted by singer-songwriter Jackson Browne on Friday September 14, 2018 at a ceremony beginning at 7:30 p.m. in the United Church on the Green at 270 Temple Street in New Haven, Connecticut. Seating is limited for the event. 

Browne is the first artist ever to receive the Gandhi Peace Award. He is being honored for extraordinary contributions of time and talent to the inseparable causes of world peace, environmental harmony, and social justice. The Award comes with a cash prize and a medallion forged from peace bronze composed of metals salvaged from the control systems of U.S. nuclear missiles. The Award Ceremony will feature short musical tributes by local performers, an appeal for action on the local and planetary levels, and the presentation of the Award itself. Consistent with tradition, Browne has been invited “to present a message of challenge and hope” to those present. A reception follows.

The Gandhi Peace Award, named after Indian anti-imperialist and nonviolence advocate Mohandas Gandhi, derives its international renown from those who have accepted it over the years, beginning with Eleanor Roosevelt in 1960. Among the other 53 awardees are Linus Pauling, Martin Luther King, Jr., Norman Thomas, William Sloane Coffin, Benjamin Spock, Wayne Morse, U Thant, Dorothy Day, Daniel Ellsberg, Kay Camp, César Chávez, Marian Wright Edelman, and George McGovern. Since 2011 the Award has been accepted by Arik Ascherman (Rabbis for Human Rights), Amy Goodman (Democracy Now!), Bill McKibben (350.org), Medea Benjamin (Code Pink), Omar Barghouti (BDS), and Ralph Nader (Public Citizen).

Jackson Browne has composed and performed songs widely regarded as among the most literate and moving songs in popular music, defining a genre of songwriting charged with honesty, emotion, and personal politics. Inducted in 2004 into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and in 2007 into the Songwriters Hall of Fame, he has three albums counted among Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 greatest albums of all time. 

Browne has organized or participated in thousands of benefit performances to support the environment, social justice, and human rights as well as causes such as music and arts education in public schools, and has worked with two former Gandhi Peace Award recipients, Amnesty International (1978) and the Children’s Defense Fund (1990). He was awarded an honorary Doctorate of Music by Occidental College for “a remarkable musical career that has successfully joined an intensely personal artistry with a broader vision of social justice.” 

Several of his albums, such as Lives in the Balance, World in Motion, Looking East, andStanding in the Breach, directly challenge imperialist foreign policy, environmental short-sightedness, and corporate greed, and question the sustainability of the present civilization. The title track of Lives in the Balance calls out the “shadow on the faces / Of the men who send the guns / Of the wars that are fought in places / Where their business interest runs” in civil wars in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala. 

In response to the Three Mile Island nuclear near-catastrophe in 1979, Browne co-founded the groups Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE) and in more recent years, Nukefree.org. During the 1980s he was active in the Central America solidarity movement, co-organizing concerts in Nicaragua, Cuba, and elsewhere.  Lately he has turned his attention to the seas as a member of the advocacy group Ocean Elders

Last December Browne released “The Dreamer” a song that considers the situation of those protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).

Reservations are recommended for the September 14th ceremony honoring Jackson Browne with the 2018 Gandhi Peace Award and can be made at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gandhi-peace-award-2018-tickets-48315261247

For more information on Promoting Enduring Peace and the Gandhi Peace Award:
PEPEACE.ORG ● GANDHIPEACEAWARD.ORG ● PEACENEWS.ORG

Tom Morello – The Atlas Underground

Tom Morello is a tireless musician and activist who fights injustice. I admire his energy, passion, and commitment to causes. I support his mission.

Tom Morello’s new album The Atlas Underground is due out on October 12.

It is a diverse collaboration of guests including Killer Mike, Vic Mensa, Knife Party, Gary Clark Jr., Steve Aoki, amongst others.

“Amid this heightened sense of impending doom, it’s now time to rally the troops in a last-ditch effort to save the planet, and our artistic souls. By challenging the boundaries of what music is and has sounded like before, you can open people’s eyes to changing the status quo in society.” – Tom Morello

TRACKLIST:
01 “Battle Sirens” (Feat. Knife Party)
02 “Rabbit’s Revenge” (Feat. Bassnectar, Big Boi, & Killer Mike)
03 “Every Step That I Take” (Feat. Portugal. The Man & Whethan)
04 “We Don’t Need You” (Feat. Vic Mensa)
05 “Find Another Way” (Feat. Marcus Mumford)
06 “How Long” (Feat. Steve Aoki & Rise Against’s Tim McIlrath)
07 “Lucky One” (Feat. K.Flay)
08 “One Nation” (Feat. Pretty Lights)
09 “Vigilante Nocturno” (Feat. Carl Restivo)
10 “Where It’s At Ain’t What It Is” (Feat. Gary Clark Jr. & Nico Stadi)
11 “Roadrunner” (Feat. Leikeli47)
12 “Lead Poisoning” (Feat. GZA, RZA, & Herobust)

The Lantern Tour: Concerts for Migrants and Refugee

Music continues to fight to defeat social injustice.

The Lantern Tour: Concerts for Migrants and Refugees

The Lantern Tour brings together art and advocacy to stand with families seeking safety at the U.S. border and the nightmare that has become their existence. From separating families to detaining them to making it harder for people to claim asylum, migrant and refugee families – including children – are under attack by the Trump administration. The Women’s Refugee Commission is at the front lines – at the border and in detention centers – to protect the rights and lives of women and children fleeing danger and crisis. The concerts will feature an evening of acoustic music by legends in the music industry that will allow us all to unite our voices in song and solidarity. Proceeds will help the Women’s Refugee Commission.

Nashville and New York tickets go on sale this Thursday July 26th
D.C., Collingswood, and Boston tickets go on sale this Friday, July 27th

The musicians appearing will vary at each show on the tour.

 

Future, If Future – Michael Stipe

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Michael Stipe teased his first ever solo song with a 40-second Instagram snippet of a track called “Future, If Future” to mark yesterday’s March for Our Lives rallies across the world. Over a frenetic electro beat, Stipe sings, “Future, if Future, this future is ours/ Stunk to high heaven lotus, nerve gas or flowers/ We’ve got the obvious, we’ve got the power/ Please don’t stare, we’re doing all we can.”