Paul Allen Joins Rock n Roll Heaven

I was sad to learn of Paul Allen’s passing today.

We visited the Experience Music Project (MoPop) several times in Seattle in past years. Paul Allen’s affinity and love for Jimi Hendrix was always evident.

I know they’re jamming in heaven right now.

Excuse them while they kiss the sky!

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Pearl Jam: Home and Away – MoPoP Museum August 11th Opening

Pearl Jam: Home and Away – MoPOP Museum, Seattle, WA

Photo by Danny Clinch

Get a first-hand look at Pearl Jam’s journey from 1990 to the present and into the future through more than 200 artifacts directly from Pearl Jam band members and their Seattle warehouse, including instruments, stage props, original art, and a photo op featuring the towering letters from the front of Pearl Jam’s debut album, Ten.

The exhibition opens Saturday, August 11 and is included with your MoPOP general admission.

OKPOP – Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture

Pop culture is global, national, and regional.  Our favorite pop culture museum is MoPOP (Museum of Pop Culture) in Seattle, Washington. It started as the Experience Music Project then it grew a second half that featured a Sci-Fi museum. It merged into the MoPOP Museum. You take the monorail from downtown Seattle to visit this experience.

Oklahoma has now launched a pop museum project called OKPOP. The Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture, which will be located in the Tulsa Arts District, will be a museum dedicated to the creative spirit of Oklahoma’s people and the influence of those artists on popular culture around the world. Stories featured in the museum will include movies, radio, television, illustration, literature, theater, Wild West Shows and Route 66— all connected to a sense of time and place through the language of music.

Copyright 2018 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved.

OKPOP is dedicated to telling the story of the creativity of Oklahoma’s people and their influence on the popular culture around the world. The OKPOP staff is actively collecting artifacts, photographs, archival materials, film, video and audio recordings that represent Oklahoma’s creative
history.

Some of the famous Oklahomans OKPOP will feature include Will Rogers, Bob Wills, Joan Crawford, Gene Autry, Leon Russell, Reba McEntire, S. E. Hinton, Garth Brooks, Wes Studi, Alfre Woodard, James Marsden, Carrie Underwood and Kristin Chenoweth, among countless others.

OKPOP is anticipated to open in 2020.

 

Mickey Hart Presents Musica Universalis

Legendary Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart is performing in a unique program at the American Museum of Natural History on Friday April 13th/Saturday April 14th in New York City.

The evening begins with a walk-through of the special exhibition Our Senses: An Immersive Experience featuring a curated soundscape based on Hart’s recently released album, RAMU.

Ramu

Then Hart will be in the Hayden Planetarium Dome for an electrifying live performance of Musica Universalis, created in collaboration with the Museum’s Director of Astrovisualization, Carter Emmart. The show will be followed by a discussion with neuroscientist Adam Gazzaley and Our Senses Curator Rob DeSalle.

It’s Alive! Classic Horror and Sci-Fi Art from the Kirk Hammett Collection

A couple of weeks ago we attended the “It’s Alive” exhibit at the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Massachusetts.

There are 100+ items on display curated from Kirk Hammett of Metallica’s private collection.

Like Kirk, I grew up as an early teen reading everything I could find about horror and sci-fi movies.  The definitive information source in the early 60’s were the Famous Monsters of Filmland and Spacemen magazines which I would buy at the local variety store.

Forrest J. Ackerman(Forry) was our monster movie subject matter authority.  He was Editor for Famous Monsters/Spacemen. He had an extensive memorabilia archive of 36,000+ items at his three Ackermansions. I learned a great deal from his authoritative articles that highlighted rare movie stills from such classics as King Kong, Bride of Frankenstein, and Dracula. His favorite sci-fi movie that he turned me on to was Metropolis by Fritz Lang (1927).

I collect music posters and they adorn many walls in my house. I gained a deeper appreciation for the rare movie posters in Kirk’s collection as an art form. Many of the posters on display were from Universal Pictures.  I never fathomed how many movies Boris Karloff and Bela Lugosi had made either individually or in collaboration.

If I had to choose one poster that enchanted me most it was the French movie poster of Frankenstein (1931) with the rare graveyard scene.

I deeply thank Kirk Hammett for sharing his private collection with the public.  I also want to thank Peabody Essex Museum for the fantastic exhibition. It brought back many deep-seated memories seeing the Universal Movie posters, lobby cards and giant green Space Invader from Mars alien.

It’s Alive! Classic Horror and Sci-Fi Art from the Kirk Hammett Collection is on view until November 26.

Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia

BAMPFA, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, is the visual arts center of the University of California, Berkeley. This exhibition is part of San Francisco’s 50th Anniversary of the Summer of Love.

Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia – Through May 21, 2017

This major exhibition is the first comprehensive exploration of the counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s and its impact on global art, architecture, and design. It presents an extraordinary array of works—many of which have been added for the Berkeley presentation—including experimental furniture, immersive environments, media installations, alternative magazines and books, printed ephemera, and films that convey the social, cultural, and political ferment of this transformative period, when radical experiments challenged convention, overturned traditional hierarchies, and advanced new communal ways of living and working. In the art, architecture, and design of the counterculture one can see early stirrings of the tech revolution and ecological consciousness, as well as powerful expressions of the wish for peace and social justice.

Clay Geerdes: Cockettes Go Shopping, 1972; digital print; 42 x 28 in.; courtesy David Miller, from the estate of Clay Geerdes.

The Cockettes, a flamboyant ensemble of hippies, gay, straight, and undecided, decked themselves out in gender-bending drag and tons of glitter for a series of legendary midnight musicals at the Palace Theater in North Beach.

The Cockettes were born on stage, New Year’s Eve, 1969. The collective passion was to take every fantasy, desire, idol and dream and in the most joyously flamboyant way possible, put it onto the stage.

Founded by Hibiscus (real name, George Harris, Jr.) the troupe performed outrageous parodies of show tunes (or original tunes in the same vein) and gained an underground cult following that eventually led to mainstream exposure. With titles like Gone With the Showboat to Oklahoma, Hell’s Harlots and Pearls over Shanghai, these all singing, all dancing extravaganzas featured elaborate costumes, rebellious sexuality, and exuberant chaos.

The Cockettes were soon heralded as the cutting edge of Freak Theatre appearing in Rolling Stone, Paris Match and even Playboy magazines. They attracted admiration from Diana Vreeland, John Lennon and Marlene Dietrich, among others. Truman Capote and Rex Reed attended a San Francisco performance of Tinsel Tarts in a Hot Coma, and Reed wrote a glowing review calling it “a landmark in the history of new, liberated theater…”