Sacred Journey Of Ku-Kai, Volume 5 – Kitaro

I prepare within the music of our heart for the next leg of the sacred journey with Kitaro to Ku-Kai. My soul is yearning to experience the universal peace brought by the bells resounding across the sacred temples.

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To Be Released On April 21st, 2017
Formats: CD / Digital Download

Available for Pre-Order

Kitaro’s Sacred Journey Of Ku-Kai Volume 5 follows the highly acclaimed Volumes 1 through 4 of the series, all of which have earned Grammy nominations.

The Ku-Kai series concept arose after the global events on the fateful day of September 11, 2001. Kitaro was traveling on a jet from Japan to Los Angeles when the transcontinental flight was diverted to Hawaii for five days due to the tragedy. It was during this time of disbelief and uncertainty that Kitaro envisioned the Ku-Kai series as a means of uniting the world through music embracing his frequently referenced universal message of peace.

The Sacred Journey Of Ku-Kai series is an earthly voyage that transports the listener to Shikoku, Japan. It pays homage to the beloved Buddhist holy man Ku-Kai who traveled the 750 mile long pilgrimage to the 88 sacred temples on the island over 1100 years ago. Each track on the album revolves around an audio sample of the bell sound from each temple. With these bell sounds, Kitaro distils their essences with inspired musical interpretations.

Tracklist:

01. Soul From Ocean
02. Breath Of Light
03. Reflection Of The Heart
04. Wave Rotation
05. Time And Space Cry
06. Sea Of Clouds
07. Floating Lotus Flower
08. Wind Invitation
09. Journey For Nirvana
10. Water Miracle

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Now The Time Has Come – Ringo Starr

The United Nations – United Nations, Ringo Starr and Digital Stars Debut “Now The Time Has Come” for International Day of Peace

LOS ANGELES, CA – September 21, 2016 – Today legendary musician, Ringo Starr, in partnership with the United Nations debuted “Now The Time Has Come”, a moving anthem to commemorate the United Nations’ International Day of Peace, recognized annually on September 21. Co-written with producer Bruce Sugar, “Now The Time Has Come”, with verses sung by Richard Page, Colin Hay and Billy Valentine, the record also features backing vocals from social media superstars Christian Collins, Maddi Jane, Casey McPherson, James Maslow and Wesley Stromberg.

“I worked on this record with Peace & Love,” said Ringo. “It was a joy to be part of this project.”

The song is part of the massive social media campaign #HugForPeace, a combination call-to-action and hashtag that promotes 24-hours of non-violence on the International Day of Peace through a simple act: a hug. The campaign was launched at the annual Ringing of the Peace Bell ceremony hosted at the United Nations Headquarters in New York on September 16 by UN Assistant Secretary-General Ray Chambers.

To ensure that young people play a leading role in the campaign, Chambers has enlisted the support of top social media stars including Christian Collins, Crawford Collins, Melvin Gregg, Maddi Jane, Chloe Lukasiak, James Maslow and Wesley Stromberg – all lending their voices in support of #HugForPeace. Partners include Facebook, Influential Network, Sprinklr, the U.S. Institute of Peace, Princess House and Religions for Peace, among others.

“Each and every one of us has an important role to play in championing peace within our communities,” said Ray Chambers, UN Assistant Secretary-General. “I am so grateful to Ringo Starr for lending his talent to unite people through the gift of song. I hope people across the world from Colombia to Syria will heed this call for peace—now.”

In 2001, the United Nations General Assembly designated September 21st as the International Day of Peace, devoted to strengthening the ideals for peace, both within and among all nations and peoples. The day was also established as an annual day of non-violence and cease-fire. The Secretary-General has asked partners to lend their voices to this call for a laying down of arms, in order to bring about a 24-hour ceasefire on September 21st.

#HugForPeace

May Peace Prevail On Earth – Gathering of the Vibes

This event is special and commences the Gathering of the Vibes on Sunday each year. It is led by the World Peace Sanctuary. I waved the flag of Peace for Palau.

The World Peace Prayer Ceremony is a global celebration of the oneness of life and the human family. With united hearts and minds, participants of the Ceremony are invited to invoke prayers for peace to prevail in the countries and regions of the world. It is a moving ceremonial ritual rising above national boundaries, religion and ideologies giving expression to the universal wish for peace and harmony which lies at the core of every human heart.

“May Peace Prevail On Earth”

Happy Birthday, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Today we honor the birthday of the late Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. as a national holiday. Happy Birthday, Dr. King, born on January 15, 1929.

Stevie Wonder , social activist, was one of the main figures in the campaign to have the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr. become a national holiday, and created this single to make the cause known.

I am a student of non-violence and peace who is incensed about the state of poverty in the United States. The division between those who have and those who have-not has never been such a chasm. Today more than 46 million Americans are living below the poverty line the most ever in U.S. history.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in his book, “Where Do We Go From Here, Chaos or Community”, a book I was studying from on the day he died, reached out to the issue of impoverishment. I share his words with you in the hopes that we together can Occupy Poverty and wipe it from the face of the earth.

Where We Are Going

from the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 1967 book
“Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?”

In the treatment of poverty nationally, one fact stands out: There are twice as many white poor as Negro poor in the United States. Therefore I will not dwell on the experiences of poverty that derive from racial discrimination, but will discuss the poverty that affects white and Negro alike.

Up to recently we have proceeded from a premise that poverty is a consequence of multiple evils: lack of education restricting job opportunities; poor housing which stultified home life and suppressed initiative; fragile family relationships which distorted personality development. The logic of this approach suggested that each of these causes be attacked one by one. Hence a housing program to transform living conditions, improved educational facilities to furnish tools for better job opportunities, and family counseling to create better personal adjustments were designed. In combination these measures were intended to remove the causes of poverty.

While none of these remedies in itself is unsound, all have a fatal disadvantage. The programs have never proceeded on a coordinated basis or at a similar rate of development. Housing measures have fluctuated at the whims of legislative bodies. They have been piecemeal and pygmy. Educational reforms have been even more sluggish and entangled in bureaucratic stalling and economy-dominated decisions. Family assistance stagnated in neglect and then suddenly was discovered to be the central issue on the basis of hasty and superficial studies. At no time has a total, coordinated and fully adequate program been conceived. As a consequence, fragmentary and spasmodic reforms have failed to reach down to the profoundest needs of the poor.

In addition to the absence of coordination and sufficiency, the programs of the past all have another common failing — they are indirect. Each seeks to solve poverty by first solving something else.

I am now convinced that the simplest approach will prove to be the most effective — the solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income.

Earlier in this century this proposal would have been greeted with ridicule and denunciation as destructive of initiative and responsibility. At that time economic status was considered the measure of the individual’s abilities and talents. In the simplistic thinking of that day the absence of worldly goods indicated a want of industrious habits and moral fiber.

We have come a long way in our understanding of human motivation and of the blind operation of our economic system. Now we realize that dislocations in the market operation of our economy and the prevalence of discrimination thrust people into idleness and bind them in constant or frequent unemployment against their will. The poor are less often dismissed from our conscience today by being branded as inferior and incompetent. We also know that no matter how dynamically the economy develops and expands it does not eliminate all poverty.

We have come to the point where we must make the nonproducer a consumer or we will find ourselves drowning in a sea of consumer goods. We have so energetically mastered production that we now must give attention to distribution. Though there have been increases in purchasing power, they have lagged behind increases in production. Those at the lowest economic level, the poor white and Negro, the aged and chronically ill, are traditionally unorganized and therefore have little ability to force the necessary growth in their income. They stagnate or become even poorer in relation to the larger society.

The problem indicates that our emphasis must be two-fold. We must create full employment or we must create incomes. People must be made consumers by one method or the other. Once they are placed in this position, we need to be concerned that the potential of the individual is not wasted. New forms of work that enhance the social good will have to be devised for those for whom traditional jobs are not available.

In 1879 Henry George anticipated this state of affairs when he wrote, in Progress and Poverty:

“The fact is that the work which improves the condition of mankind, the work which extends knowledge and increases power and enriches literature, and elevates thought, is not done to secure a living. It is not the work of slaves, driven to their task either by the lash of a master or by animal necessities. It is the work of men who perform it for their own sake, and not that they may get more to eat or drink, or wear, or display. In a state of society where want is abolished, work of this sort could be enormously increased.” We are likely to find that the problems of housing and education, instead of preceding the elimination of poverty, will themselves be affected if poverty is first abolished. The poor transformed into purchasers will do a great deal on their own to alter housing decay. Negroes, who have a double disability, will have a greater effect on discrimination when they have the additional weapon of cash to use in their struggle.

Beyond these advantages, a host of positive psychological changes inevitably will result from widespread economic security. The dignity of the individual will flourish when the decisions concerning his life and in his own hands, when he has the assurance that his income is stable and certain, and when he know that he has the means to seek self-improvement. Personal conflicts between husband, wife and children will diminish when the unjust measurement of human worth on a scale of dollars is eliminated.

Two conditions are indispensable if we are to ensure that the guaranteed income operates as a consistently progressive measure. First, it must be pegged to the median income of society, not the lowest levels of income. To guarantee an income at the floor would simply perpetuate welfare standards and freeze into the society poverty conditions. Second, the guaranteed income must be dynamic; it must automatically increase as the total social income grows. Were it permitted to remain static under growth conditions, the recipients would suffer a relative decline. If periodic reviews disclose that the whole national income has risen, then the guaranteed income would have to be adjusted upward by the same percentage. Without these safeguards a creeping retrogression would occur, nullifying the gains of security and stability.

This proposal is not a “civil rights” program, in the sense that that term is currently used. The program would benefit all the poor, including the two-thirds of them who are white. I hope that both Negro and white will act in coalition to effect this change, because their combined strength will be necessary to overcome the fierce opposition we must realistically anticipate.

Our nation’s adjustment to a new mode of thinking will be facilitated if we realize that for nearly forty years two groups in our society have already been enjoying a guaranteed income. Indeed, it is a symptom of our confused social values that these two groups turn out to be the richest and the poorest. The wealthy who own securities have always had an assured income; and their polar opposite, the relief client, has been guaranteed an income, however miniscule, through welfare benefits.

John Kenneth Galbraith has estimated that $20 billion a year would effect a guaranteed income, which he describes as “not much more than we will spend the next fiscal year to rescue freedom and democracy and religious liberty as these are defined by ‘experts’ in Vietnam.”

The contemporary tendency in our society is to base our distribution on scarcity, which has vanished, and to compress our abundance into the overfed mouths of the middle and upper classes until they gag with superfluity. If democracy is to have breadth of meaning, it is necessary to adjust this inequity. It is not only moral, but it is also intelligent. We are wasting and degrading human life by clinging to archaic thinking.

The curse of poverty has no justification in our age. It is socially as cruel and blind as the practice of cannibalism at the dawn of civilization, when men ate each other because they had not yet learned to take food from the soil or to consume the abundant animal life around them. The time has come for us to civilize ourselves by the total, direct and immediate abolition of poverty.

Mattie Stepanek – Saint of Peace and Poetry

We often think of Mattie Stepanek. His Heartsongs form an everlasting connection of peace and poetry in the Music of Our Heart.

My wife and I simply adore him. We’re so blessed to know of him through Oprah Winfrey. We smile and marvel at the generosity of their loving friendship.

Mattie is a constant inspiration as a Saint of Peace who had such an eloquent way of expressing his Heartsongs, his poems and sayings of heartfelt truth for others.

Mattie especially comes to mind today as we are on the eve of Oprah‘s final shows and tomorrow Oprah pays loving tribute to Mattie as her source of inspiration and light.

Mattie was a confirmed and committed Catholic who not only shared his faith, but also lived it each day. Most recently, a committee has been formed to explore initiating a “cause of canonization” for Mattie, so that his heroic virtues might be formally recognized by the Catholic Church.

As fellow Catholics we are reassured by the conviction of Mattie’s faith and messages. As a member of the Knights of Columbus I will be looking into how our organization can help with Mattie’s Canonization. Saint Mattie J.T. Stepanek feels so right 🙂

We are fortunate to have a Matthew in our lives, in our loving son, Matthew David Jennings. So we smile extra strong for the Matties. 🙂

We send out to Mattie and his loving Mother, Jeni and to their wonderful friend Oprah our deepest gratitude for your loving hearts of peace and faith!