Monterey Pop 50th Anniversary Lineup

3-Day tickets on sale this Friday, April 21st at 10a.m. PST

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Summerof.Love

Perhaps you share the sentiment I have experienced about wanting to visit the San Francisco Bay area to celebrate the 50th Anniversary of the Summer of Love. Should you be contemplating that journey this year I recommend you read the Summerof.Love Website.

The California Historical Society and San Francisco Travel have collaborated on this information source.

There is a treasure trove of information between the Summerof.Love site and the San Francisco Travel site. Well worth your time and investigation.

Signed,

This old hippie 😉

Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia

BAMPFA, the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, is the visual arts center of the University of California, Berkeley. This exhibition is part of San Francisco’s 50th Anniversary of the Summer of Love.

Hippie Modernism: The Struggle for Utopia – Through May 21, 2017

This major exhibition is the first comprehensive exploration of the counterculture of the 1960s and 1970s and its impact on global art, architecture, and design. It presents an extraordinary array of works—many of which have been added for the Berkeley presentation—including experimental furniture, immersive environments, media installations, alternative magazines and books, printed ephemera, and films that convey the social, cultural, and political ferment of this transformative period, when radical experiments challenged convention, overturned traditional hierarchies, and advanced new communal ways of living and working. In the art, architecture, and design of the counterculture one can see early stirrings of the tech revolution and ecological consciousness, as well as powerful expressions of the wish for peace and social justice.

Clay Geerdes: Cockettes Go Shopping, 1972; digital print; 42 x 28 in.; courtesy David Miller, from the estate of Clay Geerdes.

The Cockettes, a flamboyant ensemble of hippies, gay, straight, and undecided, decked themselves out in gender-bending drag and tons of glitter for a series of legendary midnight musicals at the Palace Theater in North Beach.

The Cockettes were born on stage, New Year’s Eve, 1969. The collective passion was to take every fantasy, desire, idol and dream and in the most joyously flamboyant way possible, put it onto the stage.

Founded by Hibiscus (real name, George Harris, Jr.) the troupe performed outrageous parodies of show tunes (or original tunes in the same vein) and gained an underground cult following that eventually led to mainstream exposure. With titles like Gone With the Showboat to Oklahoma, Hell’s Harlots and Pearls over Shanghai, these all singing, all dancing extravaganzas featured elaborate costumes, rebellious sexuality, and exuberant chaos.

The Cockettes were soon heralded as the cutting edge of Freak Theatre appearing in Rolling Stone, Paris Match and even Playboy magazines. They attracted admiration from Diana Vreeland, John Lennon and Marlene Dietrich, among others. Truman Capote and Rex Reed attended a San Francisco performance of Tinsel Tarts in a Hot Coma, and Reed wrote a glowing review calling it “a landmark in the history of new, liberated theater…”

The Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the First Human Be-In

The First Human Be-In held in San Francisco on January 14, 1967, ushered in the Summer of Love. It was a pivotal conclave with an estimated 20,000+ people in attendance.

I love that the event served as the passing of the baton from The Beats Gary Snyder, Allen Ginsberg and Michael McClure to the Flower Child generation. It is where Timothy Leary stated, “Tune In, Turn On, Drop Out”.

Today is the 50th Anniversary of that historic event, San Francisco, and the world will celebrate together!

If you’re going to San Francisco
Be sure to wear some flowers in your hair
If you’re going to San Francisco
You’re gonna meet some gentle people there – Lyrics By: Scott McKenzie, Song: San Francisco

be-in-2016

 

 

 

SF Music Hall of Fame

There are various locales that represent important music genres in the United States. I’ve been fortunate to visit New York City (infamous for Jazz), Cleveland’s Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee (representing the Blues).

I recently wrote about the National Blues Museum in St. Louis being another step in the music journey.

I have discovered another vital American music museum to see, the San Francisco Music Hall of Fame. SF Music Hall of Fame showcases artifacts and memorabilia from San Francisco’s rich and storied musical history, offering visitors a fun and informative look back at the sounds that shaped The City and how The City shaped the country. Rotating exhibits across two floors will offer people of all ages a glimpse into the San Francisco Sound.

The San Francisco Music Hall of Fame is in the design stage and will offer a stroll through the history of some of the most influential music of our time. In the halls of Music City you’ll revisit the San Francisco Sound, the Summer of Love, the Grateful Dead, Jefferson Airplane, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin, Sly Stone, Santana, Janis Joplin, and so much more.

Classic photography, concert-played instruments, vintage posters, and an ever-changing display of memorabilia is blended with modern interpretations of the music of the Bay Area to bring you a glimpse like no other into the classic rock era.

Installed in the sidewalk in front of Music City SF at 1353 Bush Street, over 330 intricately connected, engraved bricks, embedded in the sidewalk of the Music City SF building, honors local legends, including many who may never received national recognition, for their place in the rich, diverse and creative musical and cultural movements of the San Francisco Scene.

The Music City SF Walk of Fame celebrates the personalities, places and events that make up the community heritage of The City and the SF Bay Area.  From Beat Poets to the San Francisco Sound explosion of the late 1960’s to the artists of today will be enshrined. The continuous story is told brick-to-brick, section to section of the times, places, artists and performers.

Stay tuned for grand opening dates and other exciting announcements.

(Much of the text above is courtesy of the SF Music City Hall of Fame Web site)

The Haight: Love, Rock, and Revolution By Joel Selvin (Author), Jim Marshall (Photographer)

I love the immediacy of Jim Marshall‘s photographs. I own several of the late Jim Marshall’s music photography books. I treasure what his camera lens captured for rock music legacy.

Speaking of cultural history later this year we will have a new book of photographs culled from the archives of Jim Marshall, The Haight: Love, Rock, and Revolution.

Here is the book’s description from the publisher, Insight Editions.

Widely regarded as the cradle of revolution, California’s Haight-Ashbury grew in the sixties from a small neighborhood in San Francisco to a worldwide phenomenon. Legendary photographer Jim Marshall visually chronicled this area as perhaps no one else did. Renowned for his powerful portraits of some of the greatest musicians of the era, in this one-of-a-kind book the full extent of Marshall’s Haight-Ashbury work is stunningly displayed: live concerts, powerful candids, intimate sessions with icons of the day, street scenes, crash pads, and more.

Featuring hundreds of images, from Bill Graham, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Jefferson Airplane to Carlos Santana, Donovan, The Beatles, Allen Ginsberg, and Timothy Leary, The Haight tells the complete and comprehensive story of the revolutionary aspects of the day. Written by bestselling San Francisco music journalist Joel Selvin, the story behind each of these incomparable images is disclosed through an intimate and revealing narrative, lending the images a fascinating context and perspective.

I welcome this future book and the history it portrays.

© Jim Marshall Photography LLC