Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/1969

Historic Debut Concert, Band of Gypsys to Be Released In Entirety For First Time Ever

August 9, 2016- New York, NY- Experience Hendrix L.L.C. and Legacy Recordings, the catalog division of Sony Music Entertainment, are releasing Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69, fully documenting the debut performance of Jimi Hendrix’s short-lived but eternally influential Band of Gypsys on September 30. The group played four historic concerts at the Fillmore East in New York City – two on New Year’s Eve 1969, and two on New Year’s Day 1970. Never before has the first of these sets been available in its entirety. The vast majority of the performances have never seen the light of day in any configuration.

Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69 was produced by Janie Hendrix, Eddie Kramer and John McDermott, the same team who have overseen all of Jimi Hendrix’s audio and audio visual releases by Experience Hendrix L.L.C. since 1995. Kramer served Jimi Hendrix as his primary recording engineer throughout his lifetime and the newly mixed Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69 from the original 1” 8 track master tapes. The album was mastered by Grammy Award winner Bernie Grundman and will be simultaneously released, on CD, 2 LP 180 gram vinyl, high resolution SACD and digitally. Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69 is available for pre-order on CD: http://smarturl.it/jh_mg_cd and Vinyl: http://smarturl.it/jh_mg_vinyl

Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69 marks the first ever Jimi Hendrix SACD and high resolution digital release. Additionally, Experience Hendrix is also releasing People, Hell & Angels on the same day. People, Hell & Angels, a collection of previously unreleased studio recordings, peaked at #2 on Billboard’s Top 200 Album chart in March 2013. The album features studio versions of many of the songs featured on Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69.

Over the course of four extraordinary years, Jimi Hendrix placed his indelible stamp upon popular music with breathtaking velocity. Measured alongside his triumphs at Monterey Pop and Woodstock, Hendrix’s legendary Fillmore East concerts illustrated a critical turning point in a radiant career which boasted of indefinite possibilities.

The revolutionary impact Jimi Hendrix, Billy Cox, and Buddy Miles had upon the boundaries and definitions of rock, R&B, and funk can be traced to four concerts over the course of two evenings on New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. These performances were first celebrated by Band Of Gypsys, which featured six songs from the two January 1, 1970 concerts including “Machine Gun,” the album’s dramatic centerpiece. Issued in April 1970, Band Of Gypsys challenged and surprised the guitarist’s wide following with its extended arrangements and vibrant mix of rock and soul. Nonetheless, the album proved to be a runaway commercial success and sadly, with his death in London in September 1970, would become the last album Jimi Hendrix personally authorized for release.

Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69 documents the first of the group’s four legendary Fillmore East concerts. This set presents an assortment of fresh, exciting new songs such as “Earth Blues,” “Ezy Ryder,” “Stepping Stone,” “Burning Desire,” and “Machine Gun”—none of which had ever before been issued on disc. Moreover, nearly all of the group’s material had never been performed before an audience. “We decided that we couldn’t do any songs that had already been released,” explains Billy Cox. “We wanted to give them something different. So we went at the project in a joyous, creative posture and ultimately developed the repertoire of the Band of Gypsys.”

While promoter Bill Graham had advertised the concerts as ‘Jimi Hendrix: A Band Of Gypsys’, few could have anticipated what Hendrix had in store. “We had two shows New Years Eve and two shows New Years Day,” remembered Cox. “We didn’t know what to expect from the audience and the audience didn’t know what to expect from us, but from the time we hit that first note, they were in awe. You had Jimi Hendrix, a drummer who had been with the Electric Flag and Wilson Pickett, and I was the new kid on the block.”

With the anticipation of the sold out Fillmore audience heightened to fever pitch, Hendrix led his trio through a scintillating, seventy-five minute opening performance. None of the eleven songs presented had yet to grace an Experience album. In the place of signature songs like “Purple Haze” and “All Along The Watchtower” were confident renditions of “Power Of Soul” and “Hear My Train A Comin.’”

Jimi generously extended center stage to Buddy Miles, providing a showcase for “Changes” and a charged rendition of the Howard Tate R&B hit “Stop”. “We had rehearsed “Changes” and a few others for Buddy,” explains Cox. “All of the songs we performed had been rehearsed. We didn’t look at it as Buddy’s part of the show. We were all there to give. We were all there to help and material went on whether it was written by Jimi or not. Former Rolling Stone senior editor David Fricke, who authored this collection’s liner notes, describes “Stop” as being something akin to “a psychedelic power-trio Temptations.” Hendrix’s scalding version of Elmore James’ “Bleeding Heart” is the set’s only other cover, underscoring the new band’s emphasis on the blues.

As the Fillmore audience roared with approval, the Band Of Gypsys left the stage confident that they had validated Jimi’s new music before his loyal followers. “After the gigs were finished, Jimi was quite relieved,” remembers Cox. “We felt the concerts went well. I might add that in previous gigs with the Experience he had used a fuzz face [tone control pedal] and a Wah-Wah pedal, then at Woodstock he used a fuzz face, Wah-Wah pedal and Uni-Vibe, but at the Fillmore East he used a fuzz face, Wah-Wah pedal, Uni-Vibe and Octavia and it was incredible. In fact you could hear all of it kicking in on ‘Machine Gun.’ It was incredible. There were people in the audience with their mouths open.”

“Machine Gun” stands as one of Hendrix’s finest and most influential compositions. Hendrix pushed Delta blues into places its pioneers could not have imagined, fusing his extraordinary instrumental skills within his passionate expression of man’s inhumanity to his fellow man. “Machine Gun” endures as a classic amongst the already classic-drenched Jimi Hendrix canon. Fricke notes of this version, the first that Hendrix and company had ever played in concert, “..Here it is, after 46 years, another revelation – a stunning essay in pain, rage and determined survival, fully formed in its initial outing.”

Long sought after by the guitarist’s worldwide following, Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69 presents the complete performance in its original sequence.

Jimi Hendrix – Machine Gun: The Fillmore East First Show 12/31/69 (release date: September 30)

1) Power Of Soul
2] Lover Man
3) Hear My Train A Comin’
4) Changes
5) Izabella
6) Machine Gun
7) Stop
8) Ezy Ryder
9) Bleeding Heart
10) Earth Blues
11) Burning Desire

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Glenn Cornick – Jethro Tull Original Bassist, Joins The Great Beyond

English: Glenn Cornick, bass player of Jethro ...
English: Glenn Cornick, bass player of Jethro Tull. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
I awoke this morning to have the Mrs. tell me that Glenn Cornick, the original bass guitarist for Jethro Tull passed away yesterday. Glenn Cornick is the first member of the original Jethro Tull to join the Great Beyond. Sigh. Death comes to us all.

I reflect on what Glenn Cornick and the early Jethro Tull band means to me. The beautiful aspect of musicians we admire is that we can continue to stay connected with them through their recorded music.

From Glenn Cornick’s Bio on the Official Jethro Tull Website:

“This Was”, “Stand Up” and “Benefit” were to feature the personable and idiosyncratic style of Glenn Cornick during the next three years in which he played his important role in the early years of Tull.

Ever the party animal, Glenn grew apart from the other band members during 1970. This was a reflection, not of Glenn’s social waywardness, but of the reclusive and insular nature of the other guys’ rather private and atypical lifestyles.

Glenn was “invited to leave” by manager Terry Ellis but given due encouragement to form his own Chrysalis Records signed band “Wild Turkey” which enjoyed some success with records

Cover of "This Was"
Cover of This Wasand tours supporting Jethro Tull.

 

I am listening to Jethro Tull’s This Was recollecting fond memories of watching Glenn Cornick play bass live with Jethro Tull in 1969 at The Fillmore East on the Stand Up tour. I saw him once more at The Capitol Theatre in Portchester, NY April, 1970 on the Benefit tour.

Glenn Cornick was a very animated bass player. He had long black hair that he attempted to keep in control with a head band. But when he played bass he would dance wildly as his hair flopped all around his face. Loved that image of him and that’s how I want to remember Glenn Cornick best. Happily immersed in his pursuit of bass notes driving Tull along.

Peace be with you Glenn Cornick the music of our heart goes out to your family and loved ones in this time of sorrow.

Concert Review: Santana and Rod Stewart, Mohegan Sun, May 25, 2014

The last time I saw Santana live was during their co-headliner tour with the Allman Bros. in July of 2012. The band’s trend of co-headlining East Coast concerts continues this year with Santana teaming up with Rod Stewart.

I go way back in concert with each of these legendary artists. I first caught Rod Stewart as lead vocalist with the Jeff Beck Group at the Fillmore East on July 3, 1969. I then saw Santana for the first time live the following year, November 14, 1970 at the Capitol Theatre in Portchester, New York. What’s interesting about both artists is that there was a significant gap in time before I saw either of them again. I re engaged with Santana in August of 2002 (a 32 year gap). I have since seen Santana perform live an extra 19 times (21 Santana concerts in 44 years, 20 of those shows in the past 12 years). I had not seen Rod Stewart perform in 45 years. So let’s do the time warp again 😉

The concert was billed as The Voice, The Guitar and The Songs, Rod Stewart, Santana. The Santana band was the opening act. It’s important to note that this is not the Santana Corazon Tour. If you look at the Santana.com Website you will notice that the Santana Tour dates reflect two different tours, the dates with Rod Stewart and the Corazon Tour.


GALAXY DANCE INTRO
1. TOUSSAINT L’OUVERTURE
2. HOPE YOUR FEELING BETTER
3. BLACK MAGIC WOMAN / GYPSY QUEEN
4. OYE COMO VA
5. MARIA MARIA
6. FOO FOO
7. *CORAZON ESPINADO-(CINDY & BENNY SOLO)
8. JINGO
9. SACALO
10. SAJA/ RIGHT ON/ UMI SAYS
11. SMOOTH/ DAME TU AMOR

*W/ CINDY BLACKMAN-SANTANA

 

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MILES AT THE FILLMORE: MILES DAVIS 1970: THE BOOTLEG SERIES VOL. 3

Cover of "Bitches Brew"
Cover of Bitches Brew

Think of it, Miles Davis performing live at the Rock Palace, The Fillmore East from June 17-20, 1970. If only you could turn back time and be one of those lucky fans in attendance.

Well the next best thing (plus some cool extras) will soon be available from SONY Legacy Recordings (Amazon fulfills for them) and the Official Miles Davis Web Site.  The 4 CD Audio Box Set, MILES AT THE FILLMORE – Miles Davis 1970: The Bootleg Series Vol. 3 will drop on March 25th, 2014.

This was the Electric Miles era that introduced the rock audience to jazz fusion through the epic recording, Bitches Brew

The 1970 band comprised Miles Davis, Chick Corea, Keith Jarrett, Dave Holland, Jack DeJohnette, Airto Moreira, and Steve Grossman.

Carlos Santana’s love, respect and friendship with Miles Davis has fine tuned me into Miles Davis with a focused intensity I love experiencing. Even today, Santana remains awestruck by Davis’ psychedelic proto-funk, as is made clear in his liner notes to a significant restoration of the old live album “Miles Davis at Fillmore”  

“You can hear that anger and darkness and the craziness of everything that was still in the air from the ’60s when this music was made,” says the guitarist Carlos Santana, a Fillmore regular and witness to the eruption of the electric Miles Davis. “If ever there was a time when a rock audience was willing to open their ears and hear some great modern jazz like the kind Miles was creating, it was at the Fillmore.”

The extras included with the box set differ based upon your point of purchase. Order your copy of the box set at MilesDavis.com and get the exclusive poster below with your purchase!

There are three added bonus tracks that add another 35 minutes of music, released here for the first time, recorded in April 1970,(right after Bitches Brew was released) at the Fillmore West in San Francisco (where Bill Graham put Miles and band on a bill with the Grateful Dead and Stone The Crows). That live evening will be included with your purchase, everywhere.

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Humble Pie, Performance: Rockin’ The Fillmore, The Complete Recordings

Cover of "Rockin the Fillmore"
Cover of Rockin the Fillmore

There have been some electrifying live rock performances in the history of recorded music.  The early 70’s produced the best rock music recordings ever done! A favorite live show of mine from WNEW-FM progressive radio listening days and The Fillmore East was Humble Pie‘s, Performance: Rockin’ The Fillmore (1971).

Omnivore Recordings has released all four sets recorded that weekend in a four CD box set “Performance: Rockin’ the Fillmore-Complete Recordings”.

 “My God, it just took my breath away,” Jerry Shirley said of hearing the new mixes by engineer Ashley Shepherd. “You feel like you’re sitting in the Fillmore East, five or six rows back. In the quiet bits, you could hear a pin drop, and in the loud bits, you can almost feel the room shaking. And all four shows caught Steve at the absolute zenith of his powers. It’s  astonishing. I’m only sorry that he, Greg, and Dee aren’t around to enjoy it with the rest of us.”

“It was amazing to hear the new mixes of these shows after all these years,” says Peter Frampton. “This really was that version of Humble Pie at the peak of its powers—playing in a venue with a wonderful vibe.”

Frank Zappa – A Day With Frank Zappa, 1971

I love that my son Matthew is a very intense Frank Zappa music fan as a result of listening to my music collection. It has been a prideful experience to witness the depth of what he listens to and then discovers about Frank Zappa.

We have gone to see Dweezil Zappa’s band, Zappa Plays Zappa twice live including their début at The Sixth Annual Jammy Awards in 2006 at the Theater at Madison Square Garden.

http://wiki.killuglyradio.com/wiki/Frank_Zappa_(1971_Documentary)

Matthew sent me this YouTube Video link today. I am enjoying this unique Frank Zappa documentary made by VPRO-TV in Holland in 1971. Directed by Roelof Kiers. Sound recording owned by UMG. The live footage is from the Fillmore West, Nov 6 1970. The backstage footage was filmed at the Fillmore East November 13-14 1970.

There’s some great live music sequences with the Phlorescent Leech (Mark Volman) and Eddie (Howard Kaylan) along with Anysley Dunbar (Drums) and of course Frank Zappa on guitar and vocals.

The Frank Zappa home sequences took place at 7881 Woodrow Wilson Drive, Los Angeles in Laurel Canyon.

Super Session, Variations on a Theme

The original album, Super Session has begat several variations on a theme. Starting with the original, genius sessions in 1968, then moving through time Al Kooper and Columbia Records (Sony) have shown us the extended value(at times) of more collaboration, live recordings, and remastering efforts.

We begin the Super Session catalogue with the original pressing on vinyl for Columbia Records. I bought this record in the summer of 1968. I took it to high school with me often during senior year (68-69). I played it many days in my art class where we had a hi-fi system for music as a back drop. I played it the last day of high school in the gymnasium as the prom committee decorated for our prom, The Magic Carpet Ride (1969). The blues filled the gym as we seniors reflected on the last day of class. We booked the superstar band from Elektra Records, Rhinoceros to play as our prom band. They were awesome.

1) Super Session, Columbia Records CS 9701, released July 22, 1968

Sony released Super Session as a 24-bit remastered CD on April 8, 2003. I bought a copy and I was disappointed with the result. Yes like most reissues there were extra tracks, even editions of the original tracks without horns (which I abhor). But I found it overkill and a wasted effort.

What frosted my cake even more was that Al Kooper remixed Super Session in 5.1 SACD. But Sony closed the SACD division and this recording along with Blood, Sweat and Tears, Child Is The Father To Man sit on a shelf, collecting dust somewhere. Such a pity.

In late 2004 Al Kooper released this statement:

To the best of my knowledge, based on an unnamed source, the new head of SONY/BMG shut down the 5.1 SACD department and let everyone go. A year and a half ago I remixed Super Session and Child Is Father to the Man for them in 5.1 SACD. They both came out incredible and so I mastered them with Bob Ludwig. Now it seems they will languish on the shelves under the current administration of SONY/BMG.,……..Typical, in soooo many ways.” [7]

2) The Live Adventures of Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper, Columbia KGP-6, 1969

I was very excited in 1969 when I read in Rolling Stone Magazine that Al Kooper and Mike Bloomfield had a live recording coming out based on the Super Sessions. I haunted To-Ve’s Record Shop in Norwalk until that recording hit the wall rack. I loved the feel of that live recording immensely. It also introduced me to a very young Carlos Santana who stepped in to play for Mike Bloomfield when insomnia placed him in the hospital during the Fillmore West gig.

The Live Adventures of Mike Bloomfield and Al ...
The Live Adventures of Mike Bloomfield and Al Kooper (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The cover painting by Norman Rockwell is mesmerizing. Here is a picture of Al, Norman and Mike together.

3) Fillmore East: The Lost Concert Tapes 12-13-68, Legacy ‎CK 85278, April 8, 2003

The tapes for Super Session Live (East) were lost for 30 years. Fortunately they were recovered and we have the Fillmore East gigs to listen to now. The sound of the Fillmore East is unequalled in the history of live music recordings. The extra juice of this recording is that Johnny Winter was, if you will excuse the expression, white-hot in those days. Mike Bloomfield introduces Johnny Winter to the audience and he rips it up, Texas blues style.