Aerosmith’s Brave New World

Aerosmith’s 2019 residency at the Park Theater at the new Park MGM Resort will be one of the most immersive, state-of-the-art audio and video technology experiences in Las Vegas history.

Deuces

The show will feature never-seen-before visuals and audio from Aerosmith recording sessions. GRAMMY Award-winning producer Giles Martin, known for creating the soundscape for The Beatles LOVE by Cirque du Soleil show in Las Vegas, will create a spectacular show experience.

Aerosmith has teamed up with THX and L-Acoustics for their upcoming breakthrough residency at Park Theater to deliver the world’s first THX Certified live performance presented in L-ISA Immersive Hyperreal Sound.

Aldous Huxley wrote about the feelies in Brave New World in 1932. My perception is that the work THX and L-Acoustics are engineering together accomplishes that multisensory vision.

For many years WYSWYG, What You See Is What You Get has set the direction for computer technology. L-ISA’s What You Hear Is What You See clearly establishes the next platform for sound art that will drive the creative experience forward.

L‑ISA deploys multiple arrays across the performing zone, allowing audiences to distinguish instruments and voices clearly and to enjoy a level of connection to the artists they’ve never felt before. The results? Better intelligibility, closer connections, and a much larger spatialized zone. The L‑ISA Zone.

Island
Island is a personal auditorium that contains up to 25 professional-grade speakers in a single piece installation for an extraordinary listening experience

Why is this experience so exciting?

Having witnessed The Beatles LOVE twice at The Mirage in Vegas I can confirm it was the most engaging music theater experience of my lifetime. The music theatrics I witnessed constantly replay in my mind.  Giles Martin is an artistic genius on so many levels.

I am confident the immersive experience Giles Martin is designing with Aerosmith, THX/L-Acoustics, and the Park Theater will achieve the next-generation standard in audience realization.

Now I have to just figure out how to get to Las Vegas next year…

 

 

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Stay Open to the Night

The beauty of true music gems is that they wait patiently for listeners in the cloud to be found and cherished.

I enjoy exercising to Apple Music on my iPhone in search of such buried treasures. Yesterday  my heart struck gold with Charles Lloyd & The Marvels + Lucinda Williams, Vanished Gardens (Released 6/29/18). The divining rod was a Rolling Stone piece about their recent Newport Jazz Festival performance.

CharlesLloyd_VanishedGardens_cover

Vanished Gardens is the second album by Charles Lloyd & The Marvels. I play their first album,  I Long To See You often having  witnessed this nucleus live at Jazz at Lincoln Center in early 2016.

The Marvels consist of Bill Frisell on guitar, Reuben Rodgers, bass, Greg Leisz, pedal steel guitar and Eric Harland, drums.

Struck by the natural co-operation of Charles Lloyd and Lucinda Williams + The Marvels, reveling in their cohesiveness. Smiling further as each track was more eclectic than the previous. Vanished Gardens totally breaks new ground.

As Charles Lloyd says in his video conversation with Lucinda and Don Was,

“Stay Open to the Night”

A Free Press Needs You

In 1787, the year the Constitution was adopted, Thomas Jefferson famously wrote to a friend, “Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.”

That’s how he felt before he became president, anyway. Twenty years later, after enduring the oversight of the press from inside the White House, he was less sure of its value. “Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper,” he wrote. “Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle.”

Jefferson’s discomfort was, and remains, understandable. Reporting the news in an open society is an enterprise laced with conflict. His discomfort also illustrates the need for the right he helped enshrine. As the founders believed from their own experience, a well-informed public is best equipped to root out corruption and, over the long haul, promote liberty and justice.

“Public discussion is a political duty,” the Supreme Court said in 1964. That discussion must be “uninhibited, robust, and wide-open,” and “may well include vehement, caustic and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials.”

In 2018, some of the most damaging attacks are coming from government officials. Criticizing the news media — for underplaying or overplaying stories, for getting something wrong — is entirely right. News reporters and editors are human, and make mistakes. Correcting them is core to our job. But insisting that truths you don’t like are “fake news” is dangerous to the lifeblood of democracy. And calling journalists the “enemy of the people” is dangerous, period.

These attacks on the press are particularly threatening to journalists in nations with a less secure rule of law and to smaller publications in the United States, already buffeted by the industry’s economic crisis. And yet the journalists at those papers continue to do the hard work of asking questions and telling the stories that you otherwise wouldn’t hear. Consider The San Luis Obispo Tribune, which wrote about the death of a jail inmate who was restrained for 46 hours. The account forced the county to change how it treats mentally ill prisoners.

Answering a call last week from The Boston Globe, The Times is joining hundreds of newspapers, from large metro-area dailies to small local weeklies, to remind readers of the value of America’s free press. These editorials, some of which we’ve excerpted, together affirm a fundamental American institution.

If you haven’t already, please subscribe to your local papers. Praise them when you think they’ve done a good job and criticize them when you think they could do better. We’re all in this together.

Steve Perry Returns!

The Music of Our Heart is overjoyed to share with my readers and music fans everywhere that Steve Perry has returned with his first recording after 25 years!

The anticipation started yesterday morning with an Internet tease from Steve Perry on Twitter which I just had to retweet.

I then got an e-mail an hour ago from Steve Perry and Concord Music.

Steve Perry Announces New Album, TRACES
Available October 5th!

Traces

Read Steve Perry’s personal message about Traces from his heart to ours.

Then watch the video for his brand new single, “No Erasin'”

Placing my Pre-Order now!

I Know It’s Been A Long Time Comin’…
Years ago, I disappeared. There were many reasons, but mainly…
My Love for Music had suddenly left me.
I knew that simply stopping, was what I had to do.
If music was ever to return to my heart,
then and only then I would figure out what to do.
If not… so be it,
for I had already lived the dream of dreams.
Many years passed.
One day, I began sketching some musical ideas
with the creative freedom that I was the
only one who would ever hear them.
One song led to many.
My Love for Music had returned.
Then another beautiful thing happened.
I found Love.
My precious Kellie gave me a life
I never knew I had.
I lost her December of 2012.
I now deeply understand the meaning of:
“’It’s better to have Loved and Lost,
Than to have never Loved at All.”
May of 2015,
I began recording.
These songs are special to me.
I respectfully ask that you please listen to them,
And whatever they make you feel,
I thank you for listening.Sincerely,
Steve Perry 

Track Listing:

1. “No Erasin’”
2. “We’re Still Here”
3. “Most Of All”
4. “No More Cryin’”
5. “In The Rain”
6. “Sun Shines Gray”
7. “You Belong To Me”
8. “Easy To Love”
9. “I Need You”
10. “We Fly”

Finally Getting His Star on Hollywood Boulevard

You can see all the stars as you walk down Hollywood Boulevard
Some that you recognize, some that you’ve hardly even heard of

Songwriter: Ray Davies
Celluloid Heroes lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
Weird Al Star

The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce announced today that “Weird Al” Yankovic will be honored with the 2,643rd star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame on Monday, August 27th, at 11:30 a.m. PDT. The star will be dedicated in the category of Recording at 6914 Hollywood Boulevard across the street from the TCL Chinese Theatre.

“Weird Al has single-handedly created an industry of parody! His fans have been waiting for this star for a very long time. We are excited to honor this very funny man on our world-famous Hollywood Walk of Fame,” stated Ana Martinez, Producer of the Walk of Fame ceremonies.

President of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce Leron Gubler will unveil the star, along with help from Dr. Demento and Thomas Lennon.

dr-demento

The Walk of Fame star ceremony is free and open to the public. The Hollywood Chamber of Commerce encourages people who are unable to attend and fans around the world to watch the event exclusively on www.walkoffame.com.

Cheap Thrills – 50 Years Ago Today

“Four gentlemen and one great, great broad. Big Brother and The Holding Company” – Bill Graham intro

Happy 50th Anniversary to ‘s second studio album ‘Cheap Thrills’ originally released August 12, 1968. #janisjoplin

I recall bringing this album with me everywhere I went that summer. I never tire of listening to these vibrant tracks.

Cheap Thrills

Cheap Thrills is a studio album by American rock band Big Brother and the Holding Company. It was their last album with Janis Joplin as lead singer. For Cheap Thrills, the band and producer John Simon incorporated recordings of crowd noise to give the impression of a live album, for which it was subsequently mistaken by listeners. Only the final song, a cover of “Ball and Chain“, had been recorded live (at The Fillmore in San Francisco).[1]

The cover was drawn by underground cartoonist Robert Crumb after the band’s original cover idea, a photo of the group naked in bed together was vetoed by Columbia Records. Crumb had originally intended his art for the LP back cover, with a portrait of Janis Joplin to grace the front. But Joplin, an avid fan of underground comics, especially the work of Crumb, so loved the Cheap Thrills illustration that she demanded Columbia place it on the front cover. It is number nine on Rolling Stone’s list of one hundred greatest album covers. 

On March 22, 2013, the album was deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant” by the Library of Congress and thus it was preserved into the National Recording Registry for the 2012 register.[16] The album was named the 163rd best album of the 1960s by Pitchfork.[17]